Thursday, July 31, 2014

CBLDF: Graphic Novels and their Turbulent Past: Now Classroom Tools of Tolerance

San Diego Comin-Con 2014 was an absolute blast.  I had four panels, one of which was mentioned in the New York Times and audio recorded.   In lieu of a post, here is a photo of me and my esteemed panelists, as well as a link for the audio of the complete panel - questions and all - courtesy of comicbooks.com and bleedingcool.com.

So.....

For those of you who may have missed my panel (with the awesome Jennifer Holm, Matthew Holm, Charles Brownstein, Royden Lepp, Matt Phelan, and Betsy Gomez) -

"CBLDF: Graphic Novels and their Turbulent Past: Now Classroom Tools of Tolerance" (which was mentioned in the New York Times) - Here is an audio link, complements of bleedingcool.com (54:32, 49.9mb)

: http://www.thecomicbooks.com/Audio/2014-07-26-SanDiego-CBLDF_GNsAndTheirTurbulentPast.mp3



So thanks, as always for your visit and please leave your thoughts and reactions in the comments below.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

International Comic-Con: San Diego 2014 - Some Background and Batman

It's 'bout that time of year...San Diego International Comic Convention.  And, while I know ABCWednesday's Round 15 is only at "B" week, I thought I'd give some background to this truly iconic cultural event and share my schedule with you.

BACKGROUND:

Comic-Con International: San Diego
Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single
-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow.
From the beginning, the founders of the show set out to include not only the comic books they loved
,but also other aspects of the popular arts that they enjoyed and felt deserved wider recognition,  including films and science fiction/fantasy literature. After one more name change (San Diego’s West Coast Comic Convention, in 1972), the show officially became the San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC) in 1973 with the fourth annual event. In 1995, the non
-profit event changed its name to Comic-Con International: San Diego (CCI).
The show's main home in the 1970s was the fondly remembered El Cortez Hotel in downtown San Diego. In 1979
,Comic-Con moved to the Convention and Performing Arts Center (CPAC), and stayed there until 1991, when the new San Diego Convention Center opened. Comic-Con has been at home in that facility for over two decades.
With attendance topping 130,000 in recent years—in a convention center facility that has maxed out in space—the event has grown to include satellite locations, including local hotels and outdoor parks. Programming events, games, anime, the Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival
,and the Eisner Awards all take place outside of the Convention Center, creating a campus-type feel for the convention in downtown San Diego.

Photo by Kevin Green
© 2012 SDCC
Over the years, Comic-Con has become the focal point for the world of comics conventions. The event continues to offer the complete convention experience: a giant Exhibit Hall (topping over 460,000 square feet in its current incarnation); a massive programming schedule (over 600 separate events in 2012), featuring comics and all aspects of the popular arts, including hands-on workshops and educational and academic programming such as the Comics Arts Conference; anime and film screenings (including a separate film festival); games; the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, the “Oscars” of the comics industry; a Masquerade costume competition with prizes and trophies; an Autograph Area; an Art Show; and Portfolio Reviews, bringing together aspiring artists with major companies.
Comic-Con has presented literally thousands of special guests at its conventions over the years, bringing comics creators
,science fiction and fantasy authors
,film and television directors, producers, and writers
,and creators from all aspects of the popular arts together with their fans for a fun and often times candid discussion of various art forms. The event has seen an amazing array of comics and book publishers in its Exhibit Hall over the years. Over it
s four
-decade-plus history, Comic-Con International has continually presented comic books and comic art to a growing audience. That love of the comics medium continues to be its guiding factor as the event moves toward its second half-century as the premier comic book and popular arts style convention in the world.
- See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf
 Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans put on the first comic book convention in southern California. It began as a one-day mini-con called San Diego's Golden State Comic-Minicon held on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel, downtown Dan Diego. There were two guest speakers (Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer) and 100 guests.  This was so successful that they had another - this time a full-fledged, three-day Comic-con (San Diego's Golden State Comic-Con) Augutst 1-3, 1970 (also at the U.S. Grant Hotel) with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A.E. van Vogt with over 300 attendees packed into the hotel's basement.

After one more name change (San Diego's West Coast Comic-Convention), in 1972, the show officially became the San Diego Comic-Can (SDCC) in 1973, and then became Comic-Con International: San Diego in 1995. The show's main home in the 1970's was the El Cortez Hotel in downtown San Diego. In 1979, as crowds expanded Comic-Con moved to the Convention and Performing Arts Center from 1979-1991 until the San Diego Convention Center opened and now hosts the event.
Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow. - See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf
Comic-Con International: San Diego
Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single
-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow.
From the beginning, the founders of the show set out to include not only the comic books they loved
,but also other aspects of the popular arts that they enjoyed and felt deserved wider recognition,  including films and science fiction/fantasy literature. After one more name change (San Diego’s West Coast Comic Convention, in 1972), the show officially became the San Diego Comic-Con (SDCC) in 1973 with the fourth annual event. In 1995, the non
-profit event changed its name to Comic-Con International: San Diego (CCI).
The show's main home in the 1970s was the fondly remembered El Cortez Hotel in downtown San Diego. In 1979
,Comic-Con moved to the Convention and Performing Arts Center (CPAC), and stayed there until 1991, when the new San Diego Convention Center opened. Comic-Con has been at home in that facility for over two decades.
With attendance topping 130,000 in recent years—in a convention center facility that has maxed out in space—the event has grown to include satellite locations, including local hotels and outdoor parks. Programming events, games, anime, the Comic-Con International Independent Film Festival
,and the Eisner Awards all take place outside of the Convention Center, creating a campus-type feel for the convention in downtown San Diego.

Photo by Kevin Green
© 2012 SDCC
Over the years, Comic-Con has become the focal point for the world of comics conventions. The event continues to offer the complete convention experience: a giant Exhibit Hall (topping over 460,000 square feet in its current incarnation); a massive programming schedule (over 600 separate events in 2012), featuring comics and all aspects of the popular arts, including hands-on workshops and educational and academic programming such as the Comics Arts Conference; anime and film screenings (including a separate film festival); games; the Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards, the “Oscars” of the comics industry; a Masquerade costume competition with prizes and trophies; an Autograph Area; an Art Show; and Portfolio Reviews, bringing together aspiring artists with major companies.
Comic-Con has presented literally thousands of special guests at its conventions over the years, bringing comics creators
,science fiction and fantasy authors
,film and television directors, producers, and writers
,and creators from all aspects of the popular arts together with their fans for a fun and often times candid discussion of various art forms. The event has seen an amazing array of comics and book publishers in its Exhibit Hall over the years. Over it
s four
-decade-plus history, Comic-Con International has continually presented comic books and comic art to a growing audience. That love of the comics medium continues to be its guiding factor as the event moves toward its second half-century as the premier comic book and popular arts style convention in the world.
- See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf

Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow. - See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf
Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow. - See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf
Comic-Con International: San Diego began in 1970 when a group of comics, movie, and science fiction fans -- including the late Shel Dorf, Ken Krueger, and Richard Alf -- banded together to put on the first comic book convention in southern California. Comic-Con started as a one-day “minicon,” called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Minicon, on March 21, 1970 at the U.S. Grant Hotel in downtown San Diego. The purpose of this single-day event—which included two special guests, Forrest J Ackerman and Mike Royer, and drew about 100 attendees—was to raise funds and generate interest for a larger convention. The success of the minicon led to the first full-fledged, three-day San Diego Comic-Con (called San Diego’s Golden State Comic-Con), held August 1–3, 1970, at the U.S. Grant Hotel, with guests Ray Bradbury, Jack Kirby, and A. E. van Vogt. Over 300 attendees packed into the hotel’s basement for that groundbreaking event, which featured a dealers’ room, programs and panels, film screenings, and more: essentially, the model for every comic book convention to follow. - See more at: http://www.comic-con.org/about#sthash.eGzdw4Nl.dpuf
Here is a short YouTube video of the history and impact of SDCC:


TODAY:

In recent years, attendance has topped 1300,000 requiring the expansion of events to satellite locations.  Since 2011, tickets to the convention have sold out the first day and the weekend events pump over $180,000,000 into San Diego itself.

There is a giant Exhibit Hall (with over 460000 square feet) where comic books, Hollywood and television studio promotions, magazines, games and pop-culture paraphernalia can be seen and had by all.  SDCC also hosts:
  •  A massive programming schedule (over 600 separate events in 2012); 
  • Anime and film screenings (first initiated in 1976 with a new science-fiction movie just made, Star Wars); 
  • Games - including a Walking Dead Zombie Run; 
  • Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards; 
  • A Masquerade costume competition (an annual parade of fan-clad costumes with large prizes awarded to winners - which was first hosted in 1974); 
  • An Autograph Area; 
  • An Art Show and Portfolio reviews.


THIS YEAR: 
The mega-convention of almost everything pop culture runs July 24-27 and the southern California city will be awash with outrageous costumes, A-list stars, informative panels, limited-edition merchandise, fan-based art and yes, of course, aisles of rare and hard-to-find comic books.

Aside from my four panels (below), here are some other major attractions this year:
  • Lucasfilm is promoting its latest offering from a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. "Star Wars Rebels" is a new animated series which will air on Disney XD in the fall. It's set five years before the events of "Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope" and tells the story of the Rebellion’s beginnings while the Empire spreads tyranny through the galaxy.
  • To honor the 45th anniversary of the moon landing, NASA is making its first official landing at Comic-Con with panel featuring Buzz Aldrin (Apollo 11 Astronaut), moderator Seth Green (actor, writer, director and producer), Dr. Jim Green (NASA's division director of Planetary Science), Mike Fincke (NASA Astronaut), and "Mohawk Guy" Bobak Ferdowsi (Curiosity and Europa Missions).

  • Batman  turns 75 and DC Entertainment is all set with a slew of panels, previews, promotions and exhibits to help fans of all ages celebrate. Here are some highlights, but for more, check out http://finance.yahoo.com/news/dc-entertainment-celebrates-75-years-173200065.html
    •  Comic icons Frank Miller, Grant Morrison, DCE Co-Publisher and renowned Batman artist Jim Lee (BATMAN:HUSH), DCE Chief Creative Officer Geoff Johns (BATMAN:EARTH ONE), current BATMAN creative team, writer Scott Snyder and artist Greg Capullo, along with vintage superstar BATMAN team writer Denny O’Neill and artist Neal Adams in an in-depth discussion on the legendary character’s explosive adventures in comics both past and present. Thursday 3:30-4:30pm Room 6BCF
    • Delve into how Batman has been brought to life in comics, TV, movies and video games with Lee, Johns, BATMAN ’66 MEETS THE GREEN HORNET co-writer and KROQ radio personality Ralph Garman, the legendary voice of Batman Kevin Conroy (Batman: The Animated Series, Batman: Arkham Knight), producer and writer Paul Dini (Batman: The Animated Series), and Peter Girardi, Senior Vice President, Creative Affairs, Warner Bros Animation. Saturday 4-5:00pm Room 6BCF
    • Debut of Batman: The Complete Television Series with a can’t-miss panel featuring Batman on-screen legends Adam West, Burt Ward and Julie Newmar. Thursday 6-7pm Hall H
    • DC Entertainment’s interactive 4,500 square foot booth (#1915) will hold costumes donned by those who famously brought the legendary hero to life on film including Michael Keaton, Val Kilmer, George Clooney, and Christian Bale. Plus, the booth will host signings with top talent including Jim Lee, Geoff Johns, John Romita Jr., Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo and more, along with a full slate of free giveaways, fan events and on-stage demonstrations.  
    • Attend the world premiere of Warner Bros. Television and FOX’s upcoming show Gotham during the star-studded “A Night of DC Entertainment” Hall H panel on Saturday evening from 8:00–11:00 p.m.
If you, your friends, and/or family plan to be there, I hope you'll stop by at least one of my four panels and say hello.
While the crowds are REALLY large, and at times overwhelming, it is definitely worth a look if you're in the area. It is truly an EVENT.



If you're around, please come say hello at one (or all) of my panels.  
In the meantime, thank you for your visit, and please leave your comic-con experiences or reactions in the comments below.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Amelia Rules!

  “One thing I noticed about grown-ups…They’re not funny!” – Amelia, The Whole World’s Crazy by Jimmy Gownley

In honor or Round 15 for ABCWednesday and summer of 2014, I thought I'd highlight an incredible graphic novel series, Amelia Rules by Jimmy Gownley.
Amelia Rules! by Jimmy Gownley (Simon & Schuster)
Amelia Rules!  is a New York Times Bestseller. It has been nominated for thirteen Eisner Awards (four nominations in 2008 alone), five Harvey Awards, and was a short list finalist for the Howard E. Day Prize in 2002. In 2007, Volume 3: Superheroes won the Cybil Award for best graphic novel for readers aged twelve and under. In 2008 Gownley won the Pennsylvania Library Association One Book Award, and in 2012, Volume 8:  Her Permanent Record became the first Amelia Rules! Book to make the New York Times bestseller list.

There are eight books to the Amelia Rules Series:
1.     The Whole World’s Crazy
2.     What Makes You Happy
3.     Superheroes
4.     When the Past is a Present
5.     Amelia Rules!: The Tweenage Guide to Not Being Unpopular
6.     True Things (Adults Don’t Want Kids to Know)
7.     The Meaning of Life and Other Stuff
8.     Her Permanent Record

Why not take a look at the Amelia Rules! Trailer on YouTube:

And if you want more, here's an Amelia Rules! True Things Trailer on YouTube:

Finally,  here's an interview with Jimmy Gownley where he reveals all...well, almost all - espcially about being popular and background inspiration for his series:


 OVERVIEW
Amelia Rule! by Jimmy Gownley (Simon & Schuster)
Amelia Rules!  is an empowering, heart-warming story about Amelia Louise McBride who moves with her Mom to a small town in Pennsylvania to live with her uber-cool aunt Tanner, after her parents’ divorce.  Amelia, along with her friends Reggie, Pajamaman (or PJ), and Rhonda Bleenie (Amelia’s best frenemy) tackle all the world throws at them, with some guidance from Tanner, Amelia’s aunt, confidante, and former rock-star. Through laughs, challenges and spills, we all learn about friendship, family, about the “truths” of life, and about the joys of not taking anything too seriously – as long as there are people (as flawed as they may be) to provide support when necessary.
Amelia Rules! by Jimmy Gownley (Simon & Schuster)
Throughout the series, Amelia and her friends deal with divorce, bullies, death, stardom, and just about everything Gownley throws at them. From beginning to end, the series shows us how to gracefully and not-so-gracefully embrace life.
 
Aside from the wonderful “truths” and laughs that fill these pages, Gownley also creates a rich visual world for us to savor. While his characters are simply drawn (much like Charles Schulz’s Peanuts and Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes), they are by no means simple.  The image, panel and page design are dazzling. They’re vibrant, colorful, and casual, and the overall panel elements are brilliant as Gownley scaffolds levels of insight and storytelling through image, font, color, design and text. Gownley (seeming effortlessly) weaves present, past and future, with references to Scott McCloud, Bob Dylan, and other glorious and not-so-glorious pop culture references.
While these books are geared for 7-12 year olds, they are wonderfully entertaining for readers of all ages, and provide summer, school, or any-time fun.
Amelia Rules! by Jimmy Gownley (Simon & Schuster)
In short Amelia Rules!  is a story about life’s truths and challenges. It shows us it’s ever so much easier to face those challenges with friends, family and a sense of humor. And, while learning life’s lessons, the series is full of GEMS from literature, music, and philosophy. But most of all, it’s just PURE FUN.

Throughout Amelia Rule! Jimmy Gownley discusses:
  • ·      The ups and downs of friends, frenemies, bullies and group stereotypes;
  • ·      Learning how to live and navigate through divorce;
  • ·      The fears and challenges of moving;
  • ·      Whether or not Santa Clause is real;
  • ·      Dealing with death and fears of funerals;
  • ·      How people with disabilities are often treated differently;
  • ·      The affect a “bad” label can have and the importance of perspective and being true to oneself;
  • ·      Finding what makes us happy;
  • ·      Coming of age and learning to balance dreams, flaws and life’s challenges;
  • ·      How to deal with real and imagined dangers (from camping, to games like Truth or Dare and Spin the Bottle, to a parent deployed for a year overseas).
Amelia Rules! by Jimmy Gownley (Simon & Schuster)
-->
Suggested Prose Novel and Poetry Pairings
For greater discussion on literary style and/or content here are some prose novels about growing up, about being a pre-teen/teen, and about challenges of middle school and high school that you may want to read and pair with Amelia Rules!:
·      Smile and Drama by Raina Telgemeier –an autobiographic memoire about Telgemeier’s dealing with middle school, serious (and embarrassing) dental work, high school, friendships, and finding one’s voice.
·      Freckle Juice, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing;  Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret; and Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great – just a few of the books Judy Blume wrote about the honest and humorous trails of growing up.
·      Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney – a series about a boy and his struggles in middle school.
·      Pippi Longstocking – a series by Astrid Lindgren centering around Pippi, an irrepressible nine-year-old girl with a unique way of doing things.  Pippi, and her neighbors Tommy and Annika make everything into an adventure and are hard to put down.
·      Little Women by Louisa May Alcott – a series of books about sisters growing up in a time long past. Have students compare the stories, the characters and the way the authors address similar themes.
·      Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson – collections of comic strips about a rambunctious six year old with a vivid imagination and sharp intellect who shares “truths” with us much like Amelia.
·      Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud – an outstanding book and resource that brilliants explains fundamental concepts of visual literacy and the art of making comics.

Amelia Rules! by Jimmy Gowley (Simon & Schuster)
NOTE: Being summer, I am not including teaching suggestions.  For extensive teaching and classroom suggestions, please go to http://www.cbldf.org and in the search, type in "Using Graphic Novels in Education: Amelia Rules!"


 As always, thanks for your visit.
Please leave a comment before leaving and enjoy these GREAT READS!!!
In closing, here's one last glimpse:



Monday, June 30, 2014

Yearning: In Music, Literature, Television and Consumer Paradise

In  honor of ABCWednesday's "Y" Week, I thought I'd talk about yearning. According to Dictionary.com:

year [yurn]

verb (used without object)
1. to have an earnest or strong desire; long: to yearn for a quiet vacation.
2. to feel tenderness; be moved or attracted: They yearned over their delicate child.

 Famous Quotes:

“But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World
“How we need another soul to cling to, another body to keep us warm. To rest and trust; to give your soul in confidence: I need this, I need someone to pour myself into.”
Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath 
“I’m wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there: not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart: but really with it, and in it.”
Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights 
“They say "ya gotta stay hungry"...
Hey Baby...I'm just about starvin' tonight!”
Bruce Springsteen
“...Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free... ”
I never expected anyone to take care of me, but in my wildest dreams and juvenile yearnings, I wanted the house with the picket fence from June Allyson movies. I knew that was yearning like one yearns to fly.“
Books may be burned and cities sacked, but truth like the yearning for freedom, lives in the hearts of humble men and women.


Musical Yearning- 

 
 Ben Harper "Morning Yearning" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlNGEpief3Q

 


Yearning and Humor

Seinfeld "The Keys" (Do You Ever Yearn?) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnqBAuehmhM


Integrating yearning and visual literacy, I thought I'd share the infographic below on how advertisers and marketers use color and design to help play to our yearnings and affect our purchasing. While it is meant for marketing purposes, as consumers, it's awful helpful to know how we may or may not be suckered into following and feeding our impulses and yearnings.

[Note: the infographic below on how color,  design, time, and the power of words are used to play on our yearnings and affect our purchases can be found at  http://blog.kissmetrics.com/color-psychology/?wide=1 and used the following resources: dirjournal.com, colormatters.com, "The Effects of Store Environment on Shopping Behaviors: A Critical Review" by Shun Yin Lam, "The Profit of Color" by Color Marketing Group,  and "The Psychology of Color in Marketing by June Campbell.]








How do colors affect purchases?


That's about it for this week.
Thank you, as always for your visit.  Please share your yearnings in the comments below.



Sunday, June 22, 2014

Summer 2014 Reading: A-Z Graphic Novel Suggestions for Kids of all Ages

With summer 2014 knocking at our doors, I thought I'd put out an A-Z  list of some great graphic novels for readers of all ages, with my sincerest apologies to letters  "Q, V,  and Y"


[Note that I have tried to keep this list to new releases with a few outstanding 'never-old' favorites that I just couldn't resist putting out there for you.]


A
Adventures in Cartooning (ongoing series) by James Sturm, Andrew Arnold and Alexis Frederick-Frost - illustrates basic elements of cartooning while telling tells of knights, princesses, kings, dragons and faithful steeds.
 
Adventure of Superhero Girl by Faith Erin Hicks (Ages 10+) about the trails and tribulations a young female superhero must face in our modern world today (from dealing with having to buy capes from second-hand stores and having a weakness for kittens).
Amelia Rules(series) by Jimmy Gownley (Ages 8+)  is about Amelia McBride, her friends, her uber cool rock'n roll rockstar aunt, and life in small-town Pennsylvania which is anything but boring.
American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang (10+)is about the struggles of a Chinese student and the clashes and obstacles he must overcome among his peers and within himself.
Amulet (series) by Kazu Kibuishi (Ages 8+) - wonderful adventures of Emily, Navin and their mom, who move into the home of her deceased great-grandfather. Emily
finds a weird amulet and she are Navin are lured into an underground world of demons, robots, talking animals and adventures galore!
Ann Sullivan and the Trials of Helen Keller by Joseph Lambert (Ages 8+) - shows us how difficult it was for Helen (being blind and deaf) and her family and how Ann Sulivan, a young woman who herself was visually impaired revolutionized the treatment and education of the blind and deaf.

B
Babymouse (series) by Jennifer and Matthew Holm (Ages 7+) about a daydreaming, ambitious young mouse how loves cupcakes and her pink dress but hates her curly whiskers and the troubles she gets into because of her locker (more like a black hole), her friends, and her nemesis a popular cat named Felicia.
Battling Boy (ongoing series) by Paul Pope about a twelve-year-old demigod whose rite of passage is to save monster-plagued Acropolis
Bone (series) by Jeff Smith (Ages 10+)
Boxers and Saints (two-volume set)by Gene Luen Yang (Ages 12+)  that relates the history of China's Boxer Rebellion from each of the respective sides - those of the Chinese peasants versus those of the converted Chinese Christians and their European backers.

C
The City of Ember: the graphic novel by Jeanne Duprau (author) adapted by Dallas Middaugh and Niklas Asker (Ages 10+) about a dystopian underground city and the secret to its past and future. An oldie but goodie!
Comics Squad:Recess  (Ages 8+) -  a collection of short stories by Jennifer and Matthew Holm, Jarrett J. Krosoczka, Dav Pilkey, Dan Santat, Raina Telgemeier and Dave Roman, Ursula Vernon, Eric Wight, and Gene Luen Yang.
Cursed Pirate Girl (series) by Jeremy A. Bastian (Ages 10+) is about the sea-faring adventures of cursed pirate girl who while trying to find her lost father, encounters mythic creatures, gnarled and crusty pirates and much more.
D
Drama by Raina Telgemeier (Ages 12+) the companion book to Smile - now letting us in on Raina's life in high school and the drama of the drama club.
The Dodgeball Chronicles  (series) by Frank Cammuso (Ages 7+) - an Arthurian legend re-imagined about kids at Camelot Middle School - full of awesome heroes and dastardly villains.
 Dogs of War by Sheila Keenan and Nathan Fox - about the role dogs have played in World War I, World War II, and the Vietnam War.
Explorer: The Lost Islands
The Dumbest Idea Ever! by Jimmy Gownley is a memoir about Mr. Gownley's dumbest idea ever - to show a teacher the merits of comic books and write one of his own.  More importantly, though, it's about Gownley and effect his friends had back then and continue to have now.
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Explorer: The Lost Islands (series) by Kazu Kibuishi (Ages 10+) is a a graphic anthology of stories written and illustrated by award-winning graphic novelists including Kazu Kabuishi, Raina Telgemeier, Dave Roman, Jake Parker, Jason Caffoe, Michel Gagne, Katie and Steven Shanahan, and Chrystin Garland. Each story is centered around the theme of hidden places.
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Fairy Tale Comics (All Ages) - a collection of favorite fairy tales told by favorite graphic novel artists
Friends With Boys by Faith Erin Hicks (Ages 12+) about a home-schooler who transitions to high school  along with the mystery of the ghost who has followed her most of her life.
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Giants Beware! by Jorge Aguirre, illustrated by Rafael Rosado (All Ages) about three stalwart companions and their trusty dog and their quest to defeat a local giant.
Genius by Steven T. Seagle and Teddy Kristiansen (Ages 16+) about the challenges of being a theoretical physics genius, working with other theoretical genuis' and finding a fulfilling life amid undaunting competition.
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Hidden: A Child's Story of the Holocaust by Loic Dauvillier (Ages 12+) and her story of being hidden as a young girl, surviving the holocaust
Houdini: The Handcuff King by Jason Lutes (Ages 10+) the story of one of Houdini's tricks (jumping  from the Harvard Bridge with hand and feet bound in cuffs and the role his wife Bess played (told in black and white)

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I Kill Giants by Joe Kelly and J.M. Ken Nimura  about a girl struggling with life who claims she kills giants.  An oldie but awesome goodie!
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Jerusalem: A Family Portrait by Boaz Yakin and Nick Bertozzi (Ages 12+) - about the personal and political issues and decisions various members of a Jerusalem family must face in the 1940's.

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King by Ho Chi Anderson (Ages 12+) chronicles the life and times of Martin Luther King through third-person narratives, interviews, letters and speeches. It is a breath-taking work well worth the time and effort.
Korgi (series) by Chirstian Slade (All ages) - a wordless graphic novel about Ivy, her dog Sprout and the amazing things they learn about themselves and those around them as they face one dangerous adventure after another.
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Jon Chad Leo Geo and the Cosmic CrisisLeo Geo and the Cosmic Crisis by John Chad  (Ages 9+) is about Leo Geo an intrepid explorer working in his lab at Fizzmont Institute when he learns that a comet is on a collision course with his brother Matt Data's space  station.  Leo grabs his computer, leaps into a rocket and launches into space determined to save the day. Matt, however, soon learns that Leo Geo's computer is about to suffer a malfunction and turn to evil, so Matt and his trusty sidekick Maff (the smartest dog i the galaxy) leap into a spaceship to save the day. Together, Matt and Leo are in for an awesome adventure. Click here for a preview.
Lunch Lady (ongoing series) by Jarrett J. Krosoczka (Ages 7+) about the Lunch Lady who's a super hero in disguise. and inevitably ends up saving the day...
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March (ongoing series) by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell (Ages 19+) about Congressman John Lewis and his life in the 1960's and his role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Monster on the Hill  by Rob Harrell (ALL ages) about three misfits, a disbarred doctor, a town crier, and fearful dragon work together to help the dragon find his "inner-dragon" while renewing old friendships and saving the town and its reputation.
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Nathan Hale's Hazardous Tales (series) by Nathan Hale (Ages 8+)
Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong  by Prudence Shen and Faith Erin Hicks (Ages 12+) about high school life of Geeks and Cheerleaders and how even when you think nothing can possibly go wrong, something always does.
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Olympians  (ongoing series) by George O'Connor - Greek myths boldly and intelligently told for fans of all ages.
Oz: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (series)  by L. Frank Baum 's classic adapted for graphic novel  by Eric Shanower (artist) and Skottie Young (colorist)
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Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas by Jim Ottaviani and Maris Wicks  (Ages 8+) - the true story of three scientists who changed the ways we think and study primates.

R
The Reason for Dragons  by Chris Northrop and Jeff Stopkely (Ages 11+) is the coming of age story about Wendell a lonely high-school outcast who has to come to terms with bullies and his stepfather, Ted.  But, it's also the coming of age story for Sir Habersham, a Medieval Fair worker who's lost himself and his mission.
Rust (ongoing series) by Royden Lepp (Ages 9+) about a world where machines (good and bad) have had an increasing and more questionable role in war, life, and farming.
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Sidekicks by Dan Santat (Ages 8+) Captain Amazing is so busy fighting crime in Metro City, he doesn't even notice that his pets at home have developed superpowers of their own. When Captain Amazing announces he needs a sidekick the fun and battles begin!
Squish (ongoing series) by Jennifer Holm and Matthew Holm (Ages 8+) about life for pre-teen single-celled "kids"
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Tommysaurus Rex by Doug Tennapel (Ages 9+) about a boy who loses his dog, his only friend, and the summer adventures that face him on his grandfather's farm.
Tune (series) by Derek Kirk Kim and Les McClaine (Ages 12+) is part science-fiction part slice-of-life romantic comedy adventure  about Andy an art-school drop-out who finds himself in jail in a parallel universe. Click here for a preview.
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Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud (Ages 12+) while not new - a classic for anyone interested in visual literacy and creating graphic stories.

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Wonderstruck by Brain Selznick about Ben who longs for the father he has never known and Rose who dreams of a mysterious actress whose life che chronicles in a scrapbook -and how they set out on their desperate quests.

A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle adapted for graphic novel and illustrated by Hope Larson (Ages 9+) - a story of how Meg and Charles Wallace and the three Mrs. --Who Whatsit and Which fight off a dark force and save the universe.
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XOC by Matt Dembicki (Ages 8+) follows the journey of a great white shark from the Farallon Islands off the coast of San Francisco to Hawaii and back. It has wonderful details about sharks and the deep-sea perils they face as well as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch they must swim through.


Zita Space Girl (series) by Ben Hatke  (All Ages) about a girl who travels to another world, rescues a friend she sent there by mistake. She then becomes famous, must deal with her fame and the adventures that lay before her.

To all of you I wish a warm wonderful summer of happy reading.
As always, thanks for your visit and feel free to fill in any reading gaps with your own favorite suggestions in the comments below.